PLEASE REFRESH YOUR BROWSER TO ENSURE YOU HAVE THE LATEST CHANGES

2020CAROLINA SPECIAL Clinic Listing2020

We have a truly outstanding lineup of clinics with presenters from all over the Mid-Eastern Region along with several other NMRA regions. The listing below contains all the clinics and is quite lengthy. If you would like to focus on a particular day or time frame, you can use the following shortcuts:



The listing is current as of July 11, 2022. Check back monthly for additions.


Thursday - October 20, 2020
TIME Room DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
7 PM Burnham WHAT THE JUDGES ARE LOOKING FOR: The clinic is about evaluating (judging) your models. It is filled with tips for building your models to get a Merit Award in the NMRA Achievement Program. Dave Chance
Harris A DISCUSSION ON DEAD RAIL: Clinic is based on experience with using dead rail on the layout for a couple of years. Aspects to be presented include defining what dead rail is, how it works, and installations involved. Experiences including effects on pulling power, and running time considerations will be included. Andrew Stitt
Walden THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY'S MURPHY BRANCH IN THE LATE 1970s: The Southern Railway's Murphy Branch in the Late 1970s was an action packed line that has something for nearly every modeler and every space. We will take an extensive tour of the line, recreating as much as possible of how it appeared in the 1970s, and discuss modeling ideas including layouts and equipment. Paul Spilman
8:30 PM Burnham Contest Judge Meeting (Not a clinic - judges/evaluators only)  
Harris SELECTING AND USING YOUR FIRST AIRBRUSH: How to choose an airbrush that fits your needs is the first step. Now how do I use it? We cover all the questions in this clinic including what paint to use, how to get the best finish and how to clean up and prep for your next painting session. Eric Schrowang
new
Walden
LCC - What is it and who is it for?: Dick Bronson is the owner of RR-CirKits, Inc. In this clinic he discusses what LCC is and what it is not. He shows examples of who and what LCC is for. He discusses why use LCC with DCC. Then moves into the basic concepts of LCC and LCC terminology, configuration of LCC nodes and LCC configuration tools. Dick Bronson
10 PM Burnham OPEN  
Harris OPEN  
new
Walden
LCC - Applications and the future: In this follow-on to LCC: What is it and who is it for? Clinic Dick discusses LCC applications, creating an LCC network and what hardware you need. He includes JMRI preferences and signal control, block detector examples, signaling requirements, signal lamp drivers, lamp special effects, signal logic. Dick Bronson
Friday - October 21, 2022
Friday Morning                                                            Back to Index
TIME Room DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
8 AM Burnham SECTION HOUSE OR CROSSING SHANTY: First hour of a two hour make-and-take clinic on building laser cut structures. Participants may choose between a section house or a crossing shanty in either HO or N scales. Participants will need to bring the following modeling tools: Cutting mat, wood glue, canopy glue, X-ACTO knife with sharp #11 blade, metal scale rule, round tooth picks, ponce wheel (optional), thin square (optional). Acrylic paints and brushes will be provided. This is extra fare Clinic #601. Crossing Shanty (two buildings per kit): HO-$20 N-$15; Section House: HO-$25 N-$20. Clinic is limited to 20 participants. Jack Dziadul
Harris STORAGE TANKS 101 FOR MODEL RAILROADERS: A new 60 minute presentation that deals with the various kinds of storage tanks found in industry for solids, liquids and gases. Atmospheric tanks, low pressure tanks, high pressure tanks, corrosive tanks, cryogenic tanks, etc., loading and unloading racks and the tank cars that can be found servicing them. Rich Mahaney
Walden NEED MORE SIGNS!: Steve will describe the need to add more printed material to our layouts, and describe methods, tools, and tips for making your signs, roads, parking lots, etc. and printing them on a color printer. Steve Todd
9:30 AM Burnham SECTION HOUSE OR CROSSING SHANTY (continued): Second hour of a two hour make-and-take clinic on building laser cut structures. Participants may choose between a section house or a crossing shanty in either HO or N scales. Participants will need to bring the following modeling tools: Cutting mat, wood glue, canopy glue, X-ACTO knife with sharp #11 blade, metal scale rule, round tooth picks, ponce wheel (optional), thin square (optional). Acrylic paints and brushes will be provided. This is a continuation of extra fare Clinic #601. Crossing Shanty (two buildings per kit): HO-$20 N-$15; Section House: HO-$25 N-$20. Clinic is limited to 20 participants. Jack Dziadul
Harris LAYOUT BACKGROUND SOUND: Adding background sounds is a way to enhance the “multi-dimensional” effect on your layout.  Industry, city or country sounds broaden the viewing and operating experience.  There are a number of commercial “sound boards” offering pre-recorded or recordable capabilities with prices ranging from $10 to $100.  The quality of the recorded sound varies as well as the playing time. Fred Miller, MMR
Walden A DISCUSSION ON DEAD RAIL: Clinic is based on experience with using dead rail on the layout for a couple of years. Aspects to be presented include defining what dead rail is, how it works, and installations involved. Experiences including effects on pulling power, and running time considerations will be included. Andrew Stitt
11 AM Burnham JUDGING MODELS AND THE MODEL CONTEST: This clinic is for anyone who has not judged before at a regional level. It is also helpful for anyone at the Division level who judges or would like to judge Division models. It is also quite and surprisingly useful for modelers who wish to enter a model contest, either at the Division,  Regional or National level, as there are many pointers on what judges look for. It will help them in their judging and will help speed things along in the contest room. Brian Kempschroer
Harris MODEL RAILROADING IN A LIMITED SPACE - Downsizing to a shelf layout: Many model railroaders hesitate building a layout because of limited space.  When Fred Miller moved to a high-rise condo he was faced with either “arm-chair” model railroading, or continuing his life-long hobby of building model railroads.  This clinic is about how he designed and constructed “shelf layouts” to meet that desire for building an operating railroad.  One of his shelf layouts was shown in Great Model Railroads – 2019 and another can be seen on a Layout Tour during this convention. Fred Miller, MMR
Walden HOW TO HIDE YOUR RAILROAD: You said you do not have room for a railroad. Come and get some ideas about places you may not have thought about. You could hook it in the sky, hide it under the bed, or find space for it in more than just basements or attics. Michele Chance
Friday Afternoon                                                            Back to Index
TIME Room DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
1 PM Burnham MAKING WIRE TREES - PART 1: This is the first session of a two-session clinic. Participants will walk through the simple steps of making wire trees for a layout, including, shaping the wire armature including root system and adding static grass details; texturing the trunk and limbs using liquid latex; base coating and dry brushing the bark to create depth and texture; and flocking foliage to add color and fullness. The presenter will share strategies used to streamline production of these model railroad works of art. Clinic attendees will be afforded the opportunity to create their own masterpieces during the clinic!
Materials provided in Make and Take Kit: Wire (28 gauge wire ) - 270 foot skein of Floral Wire sold at Walmart; Liquid Latex (Make-A-Mold Liquid Rubber Mold Compound); Static Grass ( 2mm - 6mm); Acrylic Paint (white, black, burnt umber acrylic paint for highlighting); Spray Paint (medium brown) - spraying will be done off site between sessions; Coarse Foam for small and medium size trees in green or fall color; Super Turf for large “landmark trees” in green or fall leaf color; Disposable Brushes; Spray glue; Gloves.
NOTE: Clinic is two sessions spread over two days.
This is a $5 extra fare Clinic #604 and is limited to 25 participants.
Patty Short
Harris THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY'S MURPHY BRANCH IN THE LATE 1970s: The Southern Railway's Murphy Branch in the Late 1970s was an action packed line that has something for nearly every modeler and every space. We will take an extensive tour of the line, recreating as much as possible of how it appeared in the 1970s, and discuss modeling ideas including layouts and equipment. Paul Spillman
Walden TANK CARS 101 FOR MODEL RAILROADERS: This 60 plus minute presentation looks at the different types of tanks cars that are used today, older style tank cars, tank car features, tank car models, how to increase tank car traffic on a model railroad layout, industries that use tank cars, and loading and unloading platforms/facilities. Rich Mahaney
2:30 PM Burnham AIRBRUSHING TECHNIQUES - PART 1: Roy Becker
Harris INTERESTING FLAT CAR LOADS: This presentation looks at a variety of “stuff” that is transported on flat cars by railroads. It answers the question: “Do they really transport that 'stuff' on flat cars for real”? It will give the modeler some ideas for their own flat car loads to build. Rich Mahaney
Walden THE 200-TON DIESEL WRECK CRANE: Derricks, wreck cranes, “the big hook,”—when railroads have a major derailment causing delays, they call for the big machinery. These cranes were expensive, involving labor, locomotives, and train crews. They traveled at low speeds and took up track time.
In the early days of railroading, locomotives and rolling stock were light and easy to re-rail with jacks, wrench and blocking, and hand labor. As locomotives and rolling stock started being made out of steel, their weight became an issue. The search was on to find a way to tackle the problem. Enter the wreck crane.
All cranes are the same in basic design and function. The railroad just mounted a crane on a heavy-duty flatcar to transport the crane to the job site. The crane is only one of many pieces of retired equipment that make up the wreck train—a kitchen car, sleeper car, block car, and tool car make up a typical wreck train.
All early cranes were powered by steam; then around the 1940s, diesels were starting to be used as a power source that was far cheaper to operate and maintain. Not having to maintain a boiler was a big cost savings.
In today’s world, most railroads prefer to use outside sources to clean up derailments and rights of way. These contractors move in all of their equipment on flatbed trucks so as not to tie up track time, which the transportation people like.
Joe personally worked the 30th Street wreck train as a car repairman for about five years before becoming a supervisor. He has many good stories and memories of those years—very dangerous, but the overtime was great!
Joe will show and describe how he scratch built a 200-ton diesel wreck crane using styrene and styrene shapes.
Joe Walters, MMR
4 PM Burnham AIRBRUSHING TECHNIQUES - PART 2: Roy Becker
new
Harris
SCENIKING A FARM ON THE CHEAP: This session will show you have to use common household items to recreate a farm on your layout. Nancy Campbell
Walden HOW TO MARKET AND GROW YOUR DIVISION/REGION: Gain new ideas on how to better market and promote your Division (or Region) and improve member experiences. Topics include the benefits of membership, welcoming new members, incorporating a mentorship/buddy system, monitoring reports, doing more with social media/online presence, proper communication, working with local media, proper booth management, and overcoming special circumstances such as geography, aging members and periods of less face-to-face interaction. Christina Zambri
NMRA Marketing
Friday Evening                                                             Back to Index
TIME Room DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
7 PM Burnham MODELING THE CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA SCOTIA IRON ORE WORKS IN THE 19TH CENTURY: In the early 1800’s rich iron ore deposits were mined in the Nittany Valley of central Pennsylvania, particularly in the area known as the Barrens; pig iron was produced locally. In 1881-82, Andrew Carnegie purchased the Barrens and built the Scotia Iron Works. Over 200 tons of ore were mined and washed per day by the 250+ employees who lived in the company town of Scotia. Ore was transported on the Lewisburg & Tyrone RR to Tyrone where it continued on to the Pittsburgh steel factories on the PRR main line. The Centre County Historical Society has a crew of model railroaders building a re-creation of the Scotia Iron Works in HO scale. I have been assigned the building of two Otis-designed steam shovels. This clinic describes this undertaking. Jerry Lauchle, MMR
Harris OPEN  
Walden SELECTING INDUSTRIES FOR YOUR MODEL RAILROAD: This 60 minute presentation is designed to help model railroaders select industries and community businesses for their model railroad through a systematic approach and by answering a series of questions, thinking about how railroads service their customers, increasing railroad traffic by thinking about the types of railroad cars that are used to service the needs of different types of industries. Examples of real facilities and model railroad examples are used to make the points. Rich Mahaney
8:30 PM new
Burnham
THE Lehigh and Hudson River Railroad:  A Perfectly Proto-Lance-able Pike: The LHR was a short bridge line in north western NJ just outside of MER territory. This clinic is about a specific railroad, and also how to look at a historical railroad and develop ideas about a prototype or Protolance based modeling option. John Doehring
new
Harris
OFF THE BEATEN TRAIL: Scott shares pictures, stories and information of his travels up and down the East coast. He went into rarely seen areas where he discovered an amazing amount of prototype railroad scenes and items that the general public is unaware of their existence. Scott Davenport
Walden "QUICK INDUSTRIES" FOR YOUR MODEL RAILROAD: This is part 2 of Selecting Industries For Your Model Railroad. This 60 minute presentation is designed give model railroaders industry ideas for their model railroad that can be assembled in several evenings (or days) of work. These industries can quickly increase railroad traffic and new customers. Examples of real facilities and model railroad examples are used to make the points. Also other details involving industries such as track work, loading docks, industry placement along the tracks and industry building concepts will be looked at. Rich Mahanney
10 PM Burnham OPEN  
Harris OPEN  
Walden OPEN  
Saturday - October 22, 2022
Saturday Morning                                                           Back to Index
TIME CLASS # DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
8 AM new
Burnham
Protecting Your Digital Railroad Collection - How to Back up and protect Your data: As more of our lives go digital, how do you keep your data safe? We will cover how to ensure your digital collection is protected for the future from the most common threats. Paul Spillman
Harris SELECTING AND USING YOUR FIRST AIRBRUSH: How to choose an airbrush that fits your needs is the first step. Now how do I use it? We cover all the questions in this clinic including what paint to use, how to get the best finish and how to clean up and prep for your next painting session. Eric Schrowang
Walden MARKETING AND SELLING YOU MODEL RAILROAD ITEMS: This clinic covers marketing and selling your model railroad items. It covers Why Sell?, Infrastructure needed such as tables & chairs, How to stay positive, Do's and Don't, Props, Presentation and Pricing. John Taylor-Hall
9:30 AM Burnham SCRATCHBUILDING WITH THE CRICUT MAKER: The Cricut Maker is a cutting tool used by modelers to increase the accuracy of designing and efficiency in cutting parts to scratchbuild structures. Once dimensions are entered into the design program, the Maker efficiently arranges and cuts the components from common scratchbuilding materials, such as cardstock, sheet wood, and styrene. The clinic will begin with an overview of the Cricut Maker and Maker 3; the software, Design Space; and system requirements. Creating a digital plan, and the ease of editing a plan to incorporate corrections, or other changes, and matching the program settings to specific modeling materials will be emphasized. The presenter will use examples from his HOn3 Rio Grande Southern layout, ranging from small sheds to complex structures. The value of creating a simple mockup from inexpensive materials prior to finalizing the design will be shown. A major advantage of working digitally is the ease of converting plans in one scale to another scale. Lessons learned regarding the use of the Maker, and materials and settings suitable for use with the Maker will be shared. The clinic will end with a demonstration of the cutting tool producing the parts for a structure. Participants will leave with a simple building kit created using the Maker, offering them the opportunity to build for themselves a structure created using this tool.
This is a $5 extra fare Clinic #603 and is limited to 25 participants.
John Short
Harris THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY'S MURPHY BRANCH IN THE LATE 1970s: The Southern Railway's Murphy Branch in the Late 1970s was an action packed line that has something for nearly every modeler and every space. We will take an extensive tour of the line, recreating as much as possible of how it appeared in the 1970s, and discuss modeling ideas including layouts and equipment. Paul Spillman
new
Walden
Lend Me Your Ears - A Ten Point Manifesto for Building a New, 21st Century NMRA: This clinic is all new and presented at the Indy Junction Tri-Regional and the 2022 National. Part of this presentation is about our new idea for the NMRA at 10X – ten times bigger, bolder, and better. It has been well received so far, and is also providing a pathway for others to comment, share, and contribute to our thoughts and plans for the future. John Doehring
11 AM Burnham OPEN  
new
Harris
Southern Railway's Saluda Grade: Take a tour of the steepest mainline railroad grade in the US and how Southern Railway operated it in the late 1970s. We will cover the features of the line, basic prototypical operations for the time period, and ideas on how to model it. Paul Spillman
Walden BUILDING THE UP ROTARY SNOWPLOW: Joe will discuss how he scratch built the Union Pacific’s rotary snow plow #076. The prototype was constructed in 1950 and was last used in 1977. It is unknown whether it is still in service. The model was constructed with sheet styrene and resin cast parts using photos of the right and left sides. It has a working blade that operates off a 9-volt battery and a slow-motion motor, and has a completed underside. The plow was an entry in the contest at the 2019 Liberty Bell Special MER Convention.
Born in Northeast Philly, and now living in Bear, Delaware, Joe's career consisted of experience in the mechanical departments at the Reading Railroad, Conrail, and Amtrak. Over a 32-year period he has held jobs as a car inspector, car repairman, foreman, general foreman, manager, and assistant superintendent.
Joe Walters, MMR
Saturday Afternoon                                                          Back to Index
TIME Room DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
1 PM Burnham MAKING WIRE TREES - PART 2: This is the second session of a two-session clinic. Participants will walk through the simple steps of making wire trees for a layout, including, shaping the wire armature including root system and adding static grass details; texturing the trunk and limbs using liquid latex; base coating and dry brushing the bark to create depth and texture; and flocking foliage to add color and fullness. The presenter will share strategies used to streamline production of these model railroad works of art. Clinic attendees will be afforded the opportunity to create their own masterpieces during the clinic!
Materials provided in Make and Take Kit: Wire (28 gauge wire ) - 270 foot skein of Floral Wire sold at Walmart; Liquid Latex (Make-A-Mold Liquid Rubber Mold Compound); Static Grass ( 2mm - 6mm); Acrylic Paint (white, black, burnt umber acrylic paint for highlighting); Spray Paint (medium brown) - spraying will be done off site between sessions; Coarse Foam for small and medium size trees in green or fall color; Super Turf for large “landmark trees” in green or fall leaf color; Disposable Brushes; Spray glue; Gloves.
NOTE: Clinic is two sessions spread over two days.
This is the continuation of a $5 extra fare Clinic #604 and is limited to 25 participants.
Patty Short
Harris OPEN  
Walden JUNCTIONS, INTERCHANGES, AND DIAMONDS FOR YOUR MODEL RAILROAD: This 60 minute presentation looks at real railroad junctions, interchanges and diamonds and how they can be modeled by model railroaders. Their use can allow more rail traffic, the use of other railroad equipment and can some interesting operations. If a modeler likes a number of railroads, this is the solution to allow the many of different railroads to operate on a layout. A variety of examples from different model railroads are shown as part of this presentation. Rich Mahaney
2:30 PM Burnham GETTING A FREIGHT CAR KIT READY FOR YOUR LAYOUT: This is the first hour of a two hour make-and-take clinic focused on getting that kit you just picked up at the last train show, swap meet, purchased on eBay, or was gifted ready to run on your layout. A short presentation will be followed by each participant receiving either an Ahearn, Accurail, or Roundhouse HO scale boxcar kit either a 40’ or 50’. When the clinic is completed, the boxcar will meet your requirements to run on your layout. Participants should bring the following tools: screw driver set, file set, #11 blade knife, ruler either scale or standard, needle nose pliers, ACC and styrene glue. The following should be brought if you have them: a small portable scale that measures ounces, Kadee coupler height gauge, graphite lube. NOTE: Metal wheels, couplers, weights will be provided.
This is a $15 extra fare Clinic #602 and is limited to 20 participants.
Kevin O'Connor
Harris USING MICROCONTROLLERS IN MODEL RAILROADING: This presentation explores some easy applications for micro-controllers in the New World of model railroading. Projects using both PICAXE and Arduino series of micro-controllers in projects to run servos for turnout control and other animation such as crossing gates will be explored. Communication with the Digitrax® LocoNet® for various mobile and stationary decoder activities will be included. The clinic will make ample use of actual implemented projects on Fred’s various layouts. Fred Miller, MMR
Walden BASIC JMRI OPERATIONS WITH NO PAPER: Starting from nothing, show how to set up simple railroad operations on your layout using JMRI, including use of mobile devices to replace printed switchlists and car cards. Steve Todd
4 PM Burnham GETTING A FREIGHT CAR KIT READY FOR YOUR LAYOUT (continued): This is the second hour of a two hour make-and-take clinic focused on getting that kit you just picked up at the last train show, swap meet, purchased on eBay, or was gifted ready to run on your layout. A short presentation will be followed by each participant receiving either an Ahearn, Accurail, or Roundhouse HO scale boxcar kit either a 40’ or 50’. When the clinic is completed, the boxcar will meet your requirements to run on your layout. Participants should bring the following tools: screw driver set, file set, #11 blade knife, ruler either scale or standard, needle nose pliers, ACC and styrene glue. The following should be brought if you have them: a small portable scale that measures ounces, Kadee coupler height gauge, graphite lube. NOTE: Metal wheels, couplers, weights will be provided.
This is the continuation of a $15 extra fare Clinic #602 and is limited to 20 participants.
Kevin O'Connor
Harris TIPS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF ELECTRONIC PROJECTS FOR MODEL RAILROADS: This clinic presents a number of design and construction steps which have proved useful in electronic projects for model railroads. A simple micro-controlled blinking LEDs project (e.g. crossing signals) will be used to demonstrate the various tips and techniques. Fred Miller, MMR
Walden OPEN  
Sunday - October 23, 2022                                                                                                                                                   Back to Index
TIME Room DESCRIPTION INSTRUCTOR
8:30 AM Burnham OPEN  
Harris OPEN  
Walden OPEN  
10 AMHarris MER ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING Kurt Thompson, MMR